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institute for a discussion on the scheduled tax increases the percent to hit in january, including the end of the bush era taxes, payroll tax holiday hikes and invested in come also. a new tax policies and to report says nothing is done. average marginal tax rates would go up by five percentage points on labor income, seven points on capital gains and more than 20 points on dividends. along with more than a trillion dollars in budget cuts. also starting january or known as the fiscal cliff. it should get under way in just a moment. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, and welcome to the urban institute's first tuesday. my name is howard gleckman of the tax center blocks and we are here to discuss taxes in the fiscal cliff. as you all know, washington lives everything that happens here is the biggest or the worst were the most important. how many times for instance have you been told some politician is about to give the speech of his life until he gives the next speech. the tax armageddon has the potential to actually be a watershed in the fiscal policy. true it could be another opp
increasingly stepped up to support early childhood to also step up to the tax-writing committee and point out all of the tax loopholes we can close and all of the tax increases that were in absolutely liable the will provide the revenue that we need to provide the early childhood system with our children and families deserve. i think that is doable. >> join me in saying thank you to all of the speakers today to the [applause] thank you. we have our marching orders not. thank you to the kec foundation and c-span for joining us today. br adjourned. have a good afternoon. [inaudible conversations] >>> the potomac institute for policy studies at arlington va recently held a discussion on supply chain risks posed to the nation's cyberinfrastructure. government officials overseeing cybersecurity and the former acting senior director for cyberspace at the national security council were among the speakers at this to our event. >> ladies and gentlemen, if i could have your attention, please. my name is mike swetnam and it is my distinct honor and privilege to welcome here today for the seminar on the
-span2. after that at noon eastern the urban institute on host a discussion on tax increases that are set to take place in january. the end of the bush income tax cuts the payroll tax holiday and hikes on investment income. speakers include douglas holtz-eakin. that will be live here on c-span2 starting again at 12 in eastern. >> a look now at campaign spending and political ads in the presidential election. from the annenberg public policy center at the university of pennsylvania, this is about 45 minutes. >> i am the editorial communications director at the center for responsive politics, and we are here to talk about the challenges posted journals by dark money and their mysterious donors. erika fowler is joining me on the panel. she is from the west the medium project achieves an assistant professor of government at western university. director of the media project which tracks and analyzes all political ads aired on broadcast television in real-time during elections. she specialized in political communication and she'll be talking about some of the ads we are seeing outside groups an
florida. they don't have state taxes, so i believe revenue, you have to have revenue to sustain things that you have. i am not going to raise revenue. he said i'm not going to raise any revenue. how would you sustain your business? i don't understand why everybody else doesn't see this. you have to have revenue. if he is -- to say i'm not going to raise your taxes he is talking to the people. i don't mind paying my fair share but a lot of people are not paying their fair share. they don't realize exactly what he is saying. he doesn't care. he doesn't care about -- so he has to attack somebody. is going to be the same old thing. when republicans get in the same old thing. >> host: henry how long have you been registered to vote and not voted in a presidential election? >> caller: the last was when i was 21 but now i am really looking at it and i have a child now and it's more my responsibility to look at my child's future and when i listen to the debate, here president obama saying hey about education, i don't understand. i don't understand what everybody else is supposed to do because
he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l gates and also a distinguished fellow at the council on competitiveness. bard is a former u.s. representative from the state of tennessee. he served in congress for 26 years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led t
her accident on securing the worlder, john lewis on excise tax when it comes to the telephones. so i have a long list, a long career and history of working with both sides of the aisle because i believe at the end of the day if we're going to solve the problems facing this nation, facing the state of nevada -- high unemployment, high foreclosures, businesses going bankrupt -- if you're going to solve those problems, republicans and democrats are going to have to come together to solve those problems. >> moderator: congressman berkeley, you have a minute. berkeley: i think it's important we do work together, and on many issues we co. do. one of the things i recall working across party lines was for the elimination of the estate tax. i worked with mr. brady who sits on the ways and means committee with me. that's also crossing party lines and breaking with my own party to make sure that we do what i think is right for the american people. um, b one of the issues that's very important that we talk about a lot is jobs and making sure that we provide an environment where we can create goo
the fiscal cliff and the tax armageddon and the dysfunctional congress and all of this kind of thing. are there concrete steps the president can take as the principal foreign policy actor to reverse perceptions or to counter perceptions that the united states is in decline in terms of its global influence. >> the most important one by far is attempting to heal the rift domestically in answer to your first question we should have said what i think is the biggest change more than the five areas that tom talked about that weakens us which is that we have never been i.t. as politically polarized and divided. we have never had a dysfunctional congress or dysfunctional relationship between the two ends of pennsylvania avenue. so, the biggest thing the president can do, and he doesn't have to negotiate with any of the foreign partners to do it is to get a slide down the fiscal cliff that has a lot of lease soft landing at the bottom, and to attempt to go beyond that i think -- i hesitate to say this because it seems unlikely, but in trying to find some common ground on a range of domestic i
've often heard about people paying taxes or taxes are too high they are not appropriate. and we appreciate having fun postal service and the schools and programs like nasa that had kicked back and have given wonderful technologies that propelled us and meet people's lives more comfortable than they would have been had those technologies not entered their lives. >> host: question for you, louis. given what you say is the benefit of the government, right now is the government about the right size and what is its influence on your life? >> caller: i.t. we have to be careful when we throw the word size of the government because they're seems to be a misunderstanding as to what the size of the government is as well as the size of the government. but the reality is the problems dictate the size of the government and we shrink the government by reducing the number of federal employees and we actually then end up contacting people to do those tasks any way and we tend not to count them as the part of the government that they are a part of the government. we are just paying more for that resource n
that as not really much of a compromise. >> taxes pay for a lot of things that i oppose. [applause] >> the constitution's money does not go towards the care they object to. that's why i see it as an appropriate or a well intentioned and well functioning agreement. the money goes from women's pockets to the insurance that they are a part of, and while there may be other folks who are part of the same insurance plan, i think that happens in a lot of ways. i may disagree with someone else's health care choices, and i'm sure there's folks on insurance plans who don't believe in blood transfusions, but part of an insurance plan is we're all putting money in, and we're trusting that it will be medical treatments, that is prescribed by doctors for that person, and that we recognize an honor each other's choices about our own health care decisions. >> okay. >> the institution doesn't seem to get a choice. >> thank you. i think that's all we have time for this evening. i'm sorry. i know how, you know, emotional these issues are. we did have a lively discussion. i would like to thank our pan
, among republicans, one of the big issues is this read the bill issue. having taxed available, making sure members have the opportunity to see what it was they were voting on and i think in large part because i've be issues surrounding that and the drive to make the material available, the 112 congress really sort of march probably the biggest change in terms of transparency since the mid-90s and speaker gingrich really push the library to make comments and all that information available to the public. as we started plastering the transition last time around and going forward through this congress, i think the speaker, the reader can cantor and the republican congress as a whole has tried to clean on transparency issues and made them a priority. this not manifested in a number of different ways during our rules package, most notably was the rules change, which set for the first time in the history of the republic that paper document and electronic brake weblog. if something was available electronically, it was as good as if it had been printed by the government printing office, stuck
'm sure you are taxing or tweeting. you can tell folks if they go to www.brownv2012.com they can actually watch this conversation live online. i want to first introduced the panel. the national council of la raza. second next to her is estuardo rodriguez on hispanic issue and a partner with a group. next to his faye williams, president of the national council of black women. to her left is lenny mcallister author of get right with lenny mcallister. next to lenny we have brent wilkes way down there. sorry. all right then. we have hector sanchez, executive director labor council for latin american. he has a long business time. next to him we have ron busby for the u.s. chamber of commerce. i know ron is a good thing. next to him is alex with the hispanic media coalition, and where hector should become a we have brent wilkes, national executive director, league of united latin american citizens, and putting us up on the end there, they changed it on me, let me get here. make sure i have this right because we did some switching appeared. i'm just been to make them introduce themselves. go rig
of his tax policy or how he wants to comprehensively address immigration as he is criticizing obama for doing it piecemeal. there's got to be that -- he's not telling us the details as he is criticizing president obama. and again, on president obama's part, the press could be much more sort of aggressive on saying so here is where the house republicans blocked the 1x, y ian izzie, what are two strategies for getting around the republicans if you get a second term so hopefully some of the details will get once we start seeing the president shall be made, but i think there is -- we are not forcing them to say i'm not telling you the answer to this question enough, and there are many important questions the campaigns are not answering. >> in terms of are we giving people information they need to make a choice, i think people have information they need to make a choice. the vast majority of people are partisans of one sort or another. that's why they know probably almost every -- i doubt there are many undecided voters in this room, and they get the information they need to make a choic
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12